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University of Georgia Wins National Moot Court Competition

The University of Georgia School of Law won the final round of the 64th Annual National Moot Court Competition, held last night at the New York City Bar Association. The winning team was comprised of Steven Strasberg, Ben Thorpe, and Emily Westberry. Emory University School of Law was the runner-up team, comprised of MaryGrace Bell, Hunter Robinson, and Kyle Winchester.

Best Brief honors went to the University of Pennsylvania School of Law: Omar Madhany, Bianca Nunes, and Tian Wen, with Runner Up Best Brief awarded to University of Utah S. J. Quinney College of Law: Jeremy Christiansen and Stephen P. Dent.

Best Individual Speaker went to Ben Thorpe of the University of Georgia School of Law, with Runner-Up Best Individual Speaker going to Hunter Robinson of the Emory University School of Law.

From left: Hon. Edgardo Ramos, United States District Court, SDNY; Hon. Denny Chin, United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit; Trudi Hamilton, Fellow, American College of Trial Lawyers; Hon. Ellen Gesmer, New York State Supreme Court; Steven Strasberg, Emily Westbury and Ben Thorpe of the University of Georgia School of Law; Carey R. Dunne, President, New York City Bar Association; Hon. Judith J. Gische, Appellate Division, First Department; and The Honorable Richard J. Sullivan, United States District Court, SDNY.

The final round was judged by: Hon. Denny Chin, United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit; Hon. Ellen Gesmer, New York State Supreme Court; Hon. Judith J. Gische, Appellate Division, First Department; Hon. Edgardo Ramos, United States District Court, Southern District of New York; Hon. Richard J. Sullivan, United States District Court, Southern District of New York; Trudi Hamilton, Fellow, American College of Trial Lawyer; and Carey R. Dunne, President, New York City Bar Association.

This year, the Competition presented two constitutional issues. The first concerns whether a state law mandating that beverage retailers post a sign in their stores about the negative health effects of certain beverages violates the First Amendment. The second arises under the Commerce Clause and considers whether a state law that requires a unique mark to be placed on beverage containers sold within the state violates the Dormant Commerce Clause.

The final argument of the Competition was the culmination of more than six months of preparation and arguments by more than 194 teams from over 131 law schools in every geographical area of the country competing at the regional and national levels.

The Competition is co-sponsored by the American College of Trial Lawyers and the Young Lawyers Committee of the New York City Bar Association.

 

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