Help and Support for Mental Health and Wellbeing

WELL-BEING TIP FOR THE WEEK: PRACTICING SELF-ACCEPTANCE

True self-acceptance is embracing who we are without any judgement or conditions. It means embracing our whole self, the good, the bad and the ugly.

Accepting ourselves is even more important during this time of transition and uncertainty.

Being gentle with ourselves for not being perfect strengthens self-esteem. Having compassion for ourselves fortifies our ability to be compassionate to others, all the important people our lives, family members, friends, colleagues and clients.

Self-acceptance can facilitate resilience by moderating our reaction to issues that arise in times of crisis. It reminds us that it’s okay to do the best we can do each day.

Practice tips:

  1. Be kind to yourself, no one judges us more than we judge ourselves
  1. Stay positive, soothe the doubting voices in your head by replacing them with positive thoughts
  1. Accept imperfection, don’t let obsessing about perfection prevent you from being productive
  1. Believe in yourself, remind yourself of difficulties you have gone through and survived and think of yourself as a strong person who can deal with any challenge that comes you way

If you are faced with a challenge
Refuse to be panic-stricken
Life has not ended for you
Life flows on. Declare for yourself:
I accept the reality of this situation.
But not its permanence

Eric Butterworh


LAP RESOURCES

Although our offices are temporarily closed, LAP counseling services and resources are available remotely to our legal community and your families during this challenging time.

It’s normal for stress, anxiety and panic to arise when we are working remotely, have changes in routine, are social distancing and have concerns for ourselves and our loved ones health and well-being.

If you or anyone in your family has a mental health or substance use issue, it’s essential to keep connected.

Please feel free to contact us by phone, email or text for a confidential chat.

Eileen Travis, Director
Emily Lambert, Clinical Coordinator

Confidential helpline: 212-302-5787 (leave a message)

etravis@nycbar.org
elambert@nycbar.org

Eileen Travis, call or text: 917-488-4890

GENERAL RESOURCES

We fully understand that the changes you are making to adapt during this time very challenging time can impact your wellbeing and effect your mental health. We offer these resources to help you address any issues you may be faced with.

LAWYERS DEPRESSION PROJECT

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

The CDC site is likely to offer the most up to date information on the COVID-19 virus.

NYS DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

This New York resource is continually updated with recommendations and data.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION COMMISSION ON LAWYER ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

OFFICE MANAGEMENT/LEADERSHIP

The Leader’s Guide To Managing COVID-19 Panicby Jan Bruce

8 Strategies to Set Up Remote Work During the Coronavirus Outbreakby Marten Mickos

SOCIAL DISTANCING

"Stigma and Resiliencepublished by the CDC

Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, And Isolation During an Infectious Disease Outbreak”  published by SAMHSA

Dealing with Social Isolation” by Brian Cuban, author of “The Addicted Lawyer”

100 things to do while stuck inside due to a pandemic” published by USA TODAY

Free Online Courses from Ivy League schools

Yoga from Down Dog app

HELPLINES

The National Suicide Prevention Lifelineprovides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. 1-800-273-TALK(8255)

Crisis Text Line serves anyone, in any type of crisis, providing access to free, 24/7 support and information via a medium people already use and trust: text.

Text “HOME” to 741741 

ALCOHOL AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE RECOVERY RESOURCES

AA Online Meeting Directory

AA – Online

AA COVID-19 Informational Page

Al-Anon – Online

STRESS AND ANXIETY

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19” published by the CDC

[Lawyer] Anxiety, Self-Protective Behavior, Ethical Sinkholes, and Professional Responsibility” by Dan Defoe 

How do you keep down your stress levels at the office?” by Stephen Rynkiewicz  

STAYING MENTALLY HEALTHY

Taking Care of Your Mental Health in the Face of Uncertainty” published by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Staying Mentally Healthy During the Coronavirus” published by The Change Direction initiative 

National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) offers tips for people with mental illness


MORE WELLBEING TIPS

Practice Gratitude

Our circumstances have significantly changed in the past month, exacerbating anxiety, fear and worry. Using any of the typical stress management strategies are excellent ways to reduce stress, such as: eating healthy meals, maintaining a routine, being gentle with yourself, taking time for activities you enjoy, getting outside in nature, exercising, avoiding self-medication with alcohol or drugs, using a relaxation practice (meditation, yoga, deep breathing), reaching out to others.

Another tool for managing stress is practicing gratitude. Taking time to recognize what is good in life helps shift our focus, reframe negative thoughts and allows us to express more compassion and kindness to ourselves and our families, colleagues, friends and clients. Even in this challenging time, we can find joy in the moment.

Keep a gratitude journal. Every day, morning or evening, write down 3 things that you are grateful for. Start a gratitude jar ( a box or any receptacle will do). Any time you experience gratitude, write it down and put it in the jar. Periodically empty the jar and review what you have written. Send a gratitude email or text to share your appreciation for others who have positively impacted your life.