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Criminal Law

Federal Sentencing: Update 2010 (9.16.10)

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in United States v. Booker in January 2005 fundamentally changed the practice of sentencing in federal criminal cases. In that landmark decision, the Supreme Court found that mandatory application of the U.S. Sentencing Guidelines was unconstitutional, while preserving their place in the sentencing process. Since Booker, the Supreme Court has offered additional guidance on the proper role of the sentencing guidelines in individual sentencing through cases such as Rita v. United States, Kimbrough v. United States, Gall v. United States and Nelson v. United States. More recently, the United States Sentencing Commission has made efforts to collect and use sentencing data and the views of sentencing judges to make necessary reforms to the Guidelines. This year’s program on federal sentencing highlights the major developments of the last year with an eye toward anticipating future areas of change. The program will provide an overview of the current legal landscape as it relates to sentencing in federal criminal cases, with an emphasis on recent decisions and Guidelines amendments and the panelists will offer specific practical advice for attorneys representing defendants at each stage of the sentencing process. Read more


Representing Clients in Federal & State Criminal Tax Investigations: Defense Strategies & Prosecution Initiatives Every Attorney Needs to Know (3.11.10)

This program will focus on strategies that attorneys can use to best represent taxpayers under criminal investigation. Topics to be covered include elements of commonly prosecuted federal and state tax crimes, current IRS and DOJ tax prosecution initiatives (including foreign bank account investigations), amnesty programs, voluntary disclosures to federal and state authorities, reacting to the commencement of a criminal investigation, administrative vs. grand jury investigations, methods of proof (particularly in the context of foreign bank account reporting), common defenses, attorney-client and joint defense issues, hiring accountants to assist defense counsel, whether to file (or amend) returns while under investigation, parallel civil IRS issues (including, offers-in-compromise and civil fraud penalties), and sentencing advocacy issues under the United States Sentencing Guidelines. Read more


You Don't Practice Criminal Law & You Get That Midnight Phone Call...New York Criminal Practice 101 (4.19.10)

If you haven’t thought about criminal law since you were required to take it in law school, what can you expect to encounter when a client calls you in the middle of the night about a criminal matter? What questions do you ask? How do you counsel your client? What should you do — or not do? This program is a must for any attorney unfamiliar with the practice of criminal law. Find out everything you need to do to preserve the rights of your client (whether dealing with a minor problem or a serious matter) from the first minute your telephone rings. Read more


You Don’t Practice Criminal Law & You Get That Midnight Phone Call…New York Criminal Practice 101 (3.23.11)

If you haven’t thought about criminal law since you were required to take it in law school, what can you expect to encounter when a client calls you in the middle of the night about a criminal matter? What questions do you ask? How do you counsel your client? What should not you do — or when to listen? What’s next? What rights should I preserve? Knowing where the ethical boundary lines are.

This program is a must for any attorney unfamiliar with criminal law practice. Find out everything you need to do to preserve the rights of your client (whether dealing with a minor problem or a serious matter) from the first minute your telephone rings until the dust settles and the daylight comes. Read more